Czech Republic

The 2016 MoD budget, higher by CZK 4 billion when compared to a year before (2015), reached the CZK 47.78 billion (see chart below), which after the subtraction of the total MoD revenues (insurance & tax revenues & non-tax revenues, capital revenues and transfers received), accounted for CZK 42.65 billion. The already approved budget for 2017, reflects a further increase to CZK 52.54 billion, while forecasts for 2018 raise this figure to CZK 57.24 billion.

The Czech Republic is a landlocked state; it shares borders with Germany to the northwest, Poland to the northeast, Austria to the south and Slovakia to the southeast. The capital and largest city is Prague, concentrating about 12% of the 10.5 million (2015 data) of the total Czech population.

The country has undergone significant transitions, characterised by the “Velvet revolution” in 1989 (end of the communist regime and emergence of a new non-communist government), the “Velvet Divorce” in 1993 that separated the former Czechoslovakia into the Czech Republic and Slovakia, and finally the socioeconomic transformation that took place during those years. All the aforementioned, have occurred under massive peaceful demonstrations and no violent actions, creating a significant political and social consensus that certainly smoothed the consequences of a relative strenuous social situation. Therefore, the Czech Republic managed to preserve its position as one of the most stable and prosperous post-Communist states of Central and Eastern Europe.

Despite the negative effects of the political and socioeconomic transition, the above led to the creation of a new state structure; the separation of Czechoslovakia was forecasted as the start of an era of high economic growth for the Czech Republic, as the country would not need to support the less developed Slovakia. Confirming the predictions, the Czech Republic can be proud today, as being one of the richest and most promising post-communist economies.

According to the United Nations’ Human Development Index Report (2015), the Czech Republic ranked 28th among 188 countries –Slovakia ranks lower in 35th position-, with an index value of 0.87, placing the country in the very high human development category. Despite the better performances in HDI ranking, when compared to the previous two decades, inequalities still remain high; indicative is the fact that the 2014 Gini coefficient was 0.262 for the Czech Republic. However, total unemployment (as a % of the labour force), seems to be lower by 1.2%, when compared with the average of OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries.

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The 2016 MoD Budget was prepared with regard to increased transparency of public spending providing clear answers to the questions to which objectives are public funds spent. Objective-based budgeting and the criteria determined for valuation of their fulfilment are a basic instrument for the increased economy, efficiency and effectiveness of public spending. In accordance with Act No. 218/2000 Coll., as amended by Act No. 501/2012 Coll. and the Government Resolution No. 437 dated 16th June 2014, the 2016 Budget Draft and 2017–2018 Mid-term Outlook was prepared in the Integrated State Treasury Information System – Budget Preparation subsystem (IISSP-RISPR). Revenues and expenditures are presented in accordance with MoF regulation No. 323/2002 Coll., on the Budget Structure.

Source: http://www.army.cz
 

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The Security Strategy of the Czech Republic is the fundamental document of the Czech Republic’s security policy serving as a frame of reference for related strategies and policy concepts. It is a government document drawn up in consultation with the Office of the President of the Republic and the Parliament of the Czech Republic with the aim to seek non-partisan approaches to security issues. The Czech Republic’s security community, including representatives of both the government and of the non-governmental sector, has also been involved in the development of this strategy.

Source: http://www.army.cz/

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The Doctrine of the Armed Forces of the Czech Republic (AFCR) represents a new dimension of military professional thought in upgrading security documents and other documents relating to the Czech Republic’s reform of the armed forces. It stems from the knowledge and experience of modern warfare. It constitutes the national framework for the AFCR’s basic task – defense of its sovereignty and territorial integrity and fulfilling allied commitments of the Czech Republic.
 
Source: http://www.army.cz/

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“The Long Term Perspective for Defence 2030” represents the framework for fulfilling the political and military ambitions of the Czech Republic. It serves as a guideline for defence planning, particularly in developing five-year medium term plans. Based on an analysis of trends in the strategic environment, it outlines the basic direction for military capabilities development and provides guidance for the “Concept of the Czech Armed Forces Development 2025”, and other conceptual documents. The Long Term Perspective stems from the legal system and the strategic policy documents of the Czech Republic, and takes into account the principles of NATO and EU security policies and military documents.

Source: http://www.army.cz/

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